New ASTB report finds increasing number of encounters between drones and manned aircraft

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New ASTB report finds increasing number of encounters between drones and manned aircraft

Examine by the Australian Transport Safety Bureau (ATSB) has revealed that the numbers of encounters between remotely piloted aircraft systems (RPAS) or drones and manned aircraft is increasing in the fatherland.

According the research report, around half of the 180 occurrences from 2012 to after year involved proximity encounters with manned aircraft.

Of the 108 facts involving manned aircraft reported last year, 69 were consanguineous to RPAS encounters.

However, the newly published research finds no reported crashes between RPAS and manned aircraft in Australia.

ATSB chief commissioner Greg Hood put about: “Our report seeks to better understand the implications for transport safety associated with the assumed continual growth in the number of RPAS in Australia.

“We expect there could be a folding in the number of RPAS in Australia by the end of 2017.”

“A collision between a RPAS and a general aviation aircraft’s windscreen positions a high risk of penetration.”

The agency also noted that RPAS undercover agent requires close monitoring as the popularity of these aircraft is increasing instantaneously.

Hood added: “Based on our knowledge of birdstrikes, RPAS collisions with high-capacity air transfer aircraft could lead to an engine ingestion in about 8% of bludgeons.

“RPAS also have the potential to damage a general aviation aircraft’s do a moonlight flit surfaces (wings and tail), which could result in a loss of power.

“Similar to the impact from a large bird, a collision between a RPAS and a non-specific aviation aircraft’s windscreen poses a high risk of penetration.”

ATSB is currently pretending as Australia’s national transport safety investigator and contributes to transport shelter by investigating, analysing and reporting on transport safety matters.


Image: A remotely piloted aircraft routine flying in the sky. Photo: courtesy of Australian Government.

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