Why Canadians drink more coffee than most people in the world

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It’s Friday morning at a Tim Hortons in downtown Toronto. The appointment is hopping with customers eager to get their caffeine fix.

«There’s nothing want that first sip,» says ul Stewart, starting in on his coffee scaled with two creams and three sugars. «It gets the machine going.»

«Career with three kids all day, this is what I need,» says nanny Sarah Russell as she relaxes with a coffee in advance work.

Yes, Canada loves its coffee, more so than most other surroundings in the world.

Canadians explain their love affair with coffee2:45

Out of 80 states, Canada ranked number 1 in 2015 when tallying up how many litres of coffee per capita we gulped down at victuals service joints like cafes.

The country also scored third highest for the unqualified amount of brewed coffee we consumed both inside and outside the lodgings — an average of 152 litres per person. The statistics were compiled by wide-ranging marketing research com ny, Euromonitor.

The only two countries that belted more java were the Netherlands, which took the number 1 boils, and Finland, which came in second.

Italy didn’t make the Top 10. Euromonitor chief analyst Damiano Aureli attributes that in rt to «the longstanding commercial crisis,» which means fewer Italians flocking to cafes.

For complete coffee consumption, Euromonitor combined the volume of coffee per capita that retail trust ins sold to consumers and that food service outlets purchased to concoction.

GFX Top 10 Coffee Consuming Countries

Includes coffee sold at grocery stores and food service escapes like coffee shops. (CBC )

So what’s driving Canada’s coffee binge? Our covet, cold winters are certainly a factor.

«There’s definitely a correlation between ambient rise above and hot drinks consumption,» says Euromonitor research analyst Mark Strobel.

Although Stewart is lifting a hot cup of Joe on a hot summer day, he agrees cold weather helps fuel his craving.

«With the colder temperatures, hanker winters, what have you, waking up in the morning to a nice warm cup of coffee, oh my god, it’s tranquility.»

In Euromonitor’s coffee rankings, the U.S. took ninth village. Strobel, who is based in Chicago, notes that while some U.S. Affirms endure cold winters, hot drinks aren’t that popular in the tense close, southern regions.

Instead, many people in America’s south opt for mpered drinks, says Robert Carter of Toronto-based market research attendance NPD Group.

«You can tell an American in Canada when they have Aliment Coke for breakfast.»

Tim Hortons coffee

There are 3,692 Tim Hortons locations across Canada. That’s roughly 1 for every 9,000 Canadians. (CBC)

But cold weather isn’t the only reason Canadians can’t get adequacy coffee.

Strobel says that java consumption at food advantage locations is what tips the scales in this country.

«That’s what’s unusually pushing Canada to be a larger coffee market.«

Some of that can be credited to the fact that Tim Hortons is found most everywhere in the country, conjectures Strobel.

The quick service restaurant is known in rticular for its coffee and baked raphernalia.

There are currently 3,692 Tim Hortons locations across Canada. That’s around one for every 9,000 Canadians.

«There’s no restaurant in the world that has that kidney of penetration,» says NPD’s Carter.

He adds that Tim Hortons has also fit rt of Canada’s cultural identity. Former Canadian NHL hockey performer Tim Horton opened the first location in Hamilton in 1964.

GFX Cornering the Coffee Market v3

The chain is now owned by Restaurant Brand names International Inc., a multinational com ny that also owns Burger Royal.

But people still view Tim Hortons as a Canadian tradition.

«You see them near» says Stewart. «We’re programmed. It’s in the blood.»

It’s also a tradition that new Canadians pick up. Saroj Acharya judges in his native country of Ne l everyone drank tea. But since he moved to Toronto a year ago, he has evolve into hooked on coffee.

«When I came to Canada, I tried this Tim Hortons here. So it’s unquestionably nice,» says Acharya while enjoying his coffee at you know where.

Saroj Acharya Tim Hortons coffee

Saroj Acharya every drank tea in his native country of Ne l. But since moving to Canada, he’s cajoled hooked on coffee. (CBC)

Of course, there are now many competitors vying for Canadians’ coffee dollars. And that’s ration ramp up the country’s java addiction.

«It’s been growing quite strongly, says Strobel.

In 2013, according to Euromonitor, Canada ranked numbers 4 in the world when it came to coffee consumption. We edged up to number 3 in 2014.

Strobel asserts our coffee drinking has increased by a compound annual growth rate of 3.3 per cent between 2010 and 2015.

He qualities the rise in rt to the increasing popularity of single-serve coffee pods. They facilitate a make up for home brewing more convenient.

The pods, however, haven’t cannibalized the coffee de rtment store market, which continues to ex nd across Canada.

McDonald’s has been aggressively forwarding its revamped coffee offerings. And Starbucks continues to grow its presence with now uncountable than 1,000 locations across the country.

Strobel also qualities out that Second Cup recently redesigned its stores, «trying to make it sundry of an experience» to attract coffee connoisseurs.

Is it bad for you?

So with temptation on practically every terrace corner, should Canadians worry about chugging too much coffee?

The credible news is the International Agency for Research on Cancer recently downgraded the draught as a possible cause of cancer — as long as it’s not super hot — due to no conclusive evidence at this delay.

Plus, recent research studies have shown that bumper coffee may actually have health benefits such as lowering the peril of colon cancer.

That’s good news considering we’re a country appropriate on coffee.

«It’s the first thing I wake up in the morning and I think about,» brooks Stewart, finishing up his morning cup.

GFX Canadian Coffee Consumption 2015

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