UK’s CAA begins evaluation of airlines’ allocated seating policies

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The UK’s Well-mannered Aviation Authority (CAA) has launched an investigation to review airlines’ allocated capacity policies amid reports that current approaches are confusing travellers.

The review will be based on consumer research conducted by the CAA, which enmeshed with more than 4,000 consumers who flew as part of a group comprising two or sundry people last year.

The research found that more than half of the respondents were reportedly sought by their airline before booking their flights that they would be enduring to pay more if they want to sit together.

“The research shows that it is the uncertainty all about whether their group will be split up by the airline that is trip consumers to pay for an allocated seat.”

It also found that 10% of the sharers were informed about the seating arrangement after booking, while another 10% asserted that they weren’t informed about the additional payment.

Be at one to the study, 46% of the respondents felt negatively towards the airline after they were be sured that they have to pay more if they want to sit together or in a association.

CAA chief executive Andrew Haines said: “Airline seating practices are incontestably causing some confusion for consumers.

“Airlines are within their rights to indictment for allocated seats, but if they do so it must be done in a fair, transparent way.  Our into shows that some consumers are paying to sit together when, in the score, they might not need to.

“It also suggests that consumers drink a better chance of being sat together for free with some airlines than with others. The exploration shows that it is the uncertainty around whether their group liking be split up by the airline that is driving consumers to pay for an allocated seat.”

According to the CAA, its inquiry has found that UK consumers could be paying between £160m and £390m per annum for allocated capacity.

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