India clears new civil aviation policy

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17 June 2016

India’s mixture cabinet has approved the national civil aviation policy in order to require flying more affordable for the country’s growing middle-class, and encourage contest and regional connectivity.

The new policy has abandoned the 5/20 rule, which wants domestic airlines to operate for five years before they can fly extensively and deploys at least 20 aircraft.

However, according to the new policy, immunology vectors can start international operations if they operate 20 aircraft or 20% of totality ca city, whichever is higher, for domestic operations.

«We need more airlines, profuse aircrafts serving our Indian skies, so if more airlines want to up with to India they are welcome.»

India’s Aviation Minister Ashok Gaja thi Raju was quoted by Reuters as signifying: «We need more airlines, more aircrafts serving our Indian welkins, so if more airlines want to come to India they are welcome.»

Independently from helping Tata Group’s two latest ventures with Singapore Airlines and Malaysia’s AirAsia, the new system will also encourage other foreign airlines to enter the rural area.

A JV between Tata Group’s and Singapore Airlines, Vistara currently manages ten jets, while AirAsia India has six A320 planes.

Last year, India’s troop of ssengers flying on domestic routes had increased by 21% to more than 80 million and the domination intends to raise that number to 300 million by 2022.

The new aviation game plan has capped base fares on regional routes at Rs2,500 ($37) for a 1h flight between a metro and a lesser city.

Financial support for new ‘no-frills’ airports will also be outfitted and excise duty on fuel will be reduced according to the policy, which also points to improve the employment scenario for the commercial pilot licence (CPL) holders, who remainder jobless after their course due to the difference in the demand and supply of navigators, reported dna.

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