FAA orders inspection of CFM56-7B engines

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The US Federal Aviation Furnishing (FAA) has issued an emergency airworthiness directive (EAD) requiring airlines to inspect fan sabres of some CFM56-7B engines.

Airlines must complete engine inspections within 20 light of days from 20 April. The order follows the engine failure of a Southwest Airlines withdraw powered by a CFM56-7B engine.

The incident occurred on 17 April during a run away from New York’s LaGuardia to Dallas Love Field airport, extermination one passenger and injuring seven others.

FAA said in a statement: “The inspection desideratum applies to CFM56-7B engines.

“Specifically, engines with more than 30,000 complete cycles from new must complete inspections within 20 lifetimes.  The EAD becomes effective upon publication.

“In CFM International’s bulletin, the company recommended airlines handling ultrasonic inspections of the fan blades of their CFM56-7B engines within 20 days.”

“The machine manufacturer estimates today’s corrective action affects 352 apparatus in the US and 681 engines worldwide.”

The FAA directive is based on a new service bulletin issued to CFM56-7B machine operators by manufacturer CFM International.

In CFM International’s bulletin, the company recommended airlines regulation ultrasonic inspections of the fan blades of their CFM56-7B engines within 20 lifetimes.

The inspection covers engines that have completed more than 30,000 rounds, affecting more than 680 units.

CFM has also suggested for train drivers to inspect engines with fan blades that will be completing 20,000 series by the end of August this year. This inspection is estimated to affect about 2,500 engines.

All other fan blades have also been counseled for inspection when they reach 20,000 cycles.

Currently, encompassing 14,000 CFM56-7B engines are in operation with several airlines across the orb. The engine type primarily powers Boeing’s next-generation 737 aircraft.

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