Cyber jihadi admits hiding ISIS data in James Bond-style cuff links

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Samata UllahWALES News programme SERVICE

Cyber jihadi admits hiding ISIS data in James Bond-style cuff bonds

Samata Ullah had 30 sets of links each with a micro computer memory storage device hidden inside.

One was loaded with a stash away of extremist material including a “wish list” of skills needed by Islamic Country — also known as ISIS, IS or Daesh — jihadis.

Ullah, 34, was a volunteer in the Cyber Caliphate Army which is over to assisting ISIS through internet crime.

The group specialises in cut and “issuing death writs”, a court heard.

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Police found the cufflinks and a huge amount of extremist material when they police busted his home

Mr Ullah’s primary criminality is over the internet and in his communications with others globally embracing those connected with IS

David Cawthorne

Covering his face and using complicated software to disguise his strong Welsh accent, Ullah filmed instructional videos for beau terrorists on how to avoid detection while online.

Police found the cufflinks and a enormous amount of extremist material when they raided his home in Cardiff, in September in year.

Officers also found books about guided ballistic missiles, the Old Bailey was told.

Ullah admitted five terror charges incorporating membership of ISIS in March this year.

HackGETTY

The group specialises in lackey and “issuing death writs”, a court heard

He denied directing terrorism and the claim was left on the file.

Reporting of the case was postponed until yesterday when Attorney Generalized Jeremy Wright, QC, announced he has accepted the pleas.

Ullah, who was not in court today, whim be sentenced on April 28 at the Old Bailey.

He is believed to have bought 50 rates of special cuff links via a Chinese website and sold about 11 on eBay beneath the waves the name “cardiff-trader.”

HackGETTY

Ullah filmed instructional videos for paramour terrorists on how to avoid detection while online

An earlier hearing was know scolded how Ullah volunteered for the Cyber Caliphate Army to put his computer expertise at the disposal of ISIS.

David Cawthorne, following, told London Westminster Magistrates Court: “Mr Ullah’s primary criminality is exceeding the internet and in his communications with others globally including those tied with IS.»

He was responsible for an encrypted ISIS internet blog, Mr Cawthorne said.

During one of his instructional videos, he fill in a reference to Al Qaeda’s notorious terrorist guide called, ‘How to build a batter in your mum’s kitchen’.

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He is believed to have procure 50 sets of special cuff links

Ullah was also said to have been in ring up with an alleged ISIS figher who is awaiting trial for terrorism in Kenya.

Come after his arrest, Ullah gave 13 no comment interviews to police, the court advised.

But his handed officers two prepared statements claiming he did not support IS but wanted to profit an “understanding of the troubles of the Muslim world.”

The instructional videos were for “impertinence of speech purposes,” he told police.

Ullah later admitted membership of ISIS, two considers of possessing articles connected with terrorism, one of preparing an act of terrorism and one of chaining terrorists.

Commander Dean Haydon, of Scotland Yard’s counter terrorism command, rephrased outside court: “Just because Ullah’s activity was in the virtual the world at large we never underestimated how dangerous his activity was.

“He sat in his bedroom in Wales and created online gratified with the sole intention of aiding people who wanted to actively withstand IS and avoid getting caught by the authorities.

“This is just the sort of bumf that may have helped people involved in planning devastating, low intricate level, attacks on crowded places as we have seen in other conurbations across the world.

“This conviction is a success, but we need to keep prospering, which makes it important that we all remain vigilant and people act at the earliest occasion by calling us confidentially if they are concerned about any suspicious activity.”

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